close
close
Best

Best Wildlife Photographer Of The Year: People’s Choice Award Winners

Against the backdrop of the spectacular mountains of Ladakh in northern India, a snow leopard is captured in perfect pose by a carefully positioned camera trap.

The image by German photographer Sascha Fonseca was voted the winner of the People’s Choice Award Wildlife Photographer of the Year.

Thick snow covers the ground, but the big cat’s thick coat and furry paw pads keep it warm. Fonseca captured this image high in the Indian Himalayas during a three-year, bait-free camera trap project.

Known as “spirits of the mountains,” members of this elusive species are incredibly difficult to photograph in the wild due to their camouflage and camouflage — as well as being found in small numbers in remote, harsh habitats.

With an estimated 6,500 adult animals living in the wild, these big cats face constant threats from poaching, habitat loss and human-animal conflict. “I am incredibly proud to be the winner of this year’s People’s Choice Award and thank all of our supporters around the world for making this possible,” said Fonseca. “Photography can connect people to wildlife and encourage them to appreciate the beauty of the unseen natural world. I believe that a better understanding of wildlife will lead to deeper caring, which will hopefully lead to active support and greater public interest in conservation.”

The winning photo, along with four other finalists, was selected from a shortlist of 25 images selected by the Natural History Museum from nearly 50,000 images submitted for the general Wildlife Photographer Of The Year competition.

This year’s vote reached a record 60,466 nature photography fans. The winners will be on display in the redesigned Wildlife Photographer of the Year exhibition at the Natural History Museum of London until 2 July 2023.

“This year’s record number of votes demonstrates how wildlife photography can engage and inspire audiences with the wonders of nature,” said Douglas Gurr, director of the Natural History Museum.

Developed and produced by the Natural History Museum, Wildlife Photographer of the Year provides a global platform for amateur and professional photographers alike. The fifty-ninth competition is currently being judged by a panel of experts and the winners will be announced in October 2023.

The other four Highly Commended finalists, who captured the fascination of nature lovers around the world, include Igor Altuna’s Holding On, a dramatic image of a leopard carrying a dead monkey and its baby, and Fox Affection ‘ by Brittany Crossman. shows red foxes greeting each other with an affectionate snout.

In Martin Gregus’ Among the Flowers, a polar bear cub plays among flowers on the shores of Hudson Bay, Canada, while Marina Cano’s Portrait of Olobor is a stunning shot of a male lion in Kenya’s Maasai Mara.

This polar bear cub played in a mass of fireweed on the shore of Hudson Bay in Manitoba, Canada.

To capture the world from the boy’s perspective, Martin placed his camera – housed in an underwater case to protect it from other curious bears – at ground level among fireweed and waited patiently at a safe distance with a remote shutter release.

This dramatic image of a female leopard who killed a monkey in Zambia’s South Luangwa National Park captured the monkey’s still-living baby clinging to its mother.

Igor watched as the predator calmly walked back to her own baby. Her cub played with the baby monkey for more than an hour before killing it, almost as if it had been given live prey for hunting lessons.

It was late afternoon when Cano found Olobor, one of the famous coalition of five males in the Black Rock pack in Kenya’s Masai Mara National Reserve, resting. She successfully stages his majestic and defiant gaze against the dark background.

All the scrub around the lion was black, having been burned by local Maasai herders to encourage new grass blooms.

Two red foxes greet each other with an intimate cuddle on a chilly day on the North Shore of Prince Edward Island, Canada.

The red fox’s mating season is in winter, and it is not uncommon to see them together before denning.

MORE FROM FORBES20 exceptional national winners from the Sony World Photography Awards
follow me Twitter or LinkedIn. Cash some of my other work here.

Read  Odds, Expert Picks for Mavericks vs Grizzlies, Warriors vs Rockets

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Check Also
Close
Back to top button
x